Your Swiss Commercial Litigator

Since twenty years, more precisely since 1998, I have been dealing with commercial disputes in Switzerland or related to Switzerland, from small commercial litigations before Swiss state courts to very important international commercial arbitrations before arbitral tribunals seated in Switzerland.

My practical experience with commercial disputes is one aspect, but I have not only been involved in various commercial disputes practically, both as external counsel as well as in-house counsel, but have also been publishing in peer-reviewed legal journals on various commercial disputes-related topics.

Speaking of legal articles, in Switzerland commercial disputes lawyers write much more than they orally plead cases. The image of the American trial lawyer, who presents a case in a rhetorically brilliant manner to a jury, has nothing to do with the practice of commercial courts in Switzerland. At Swiss commercial courts, the proceedings are as a general rule predominantly conducted in writing, so that the life of a commercial litigator practicing in Switzerland consists primarily of studying files and drafting submissions. For this reason, it is essential that as a Swiss commercial disputes lawyer you are a good writer.

As a Swiss commercial litigator you also have to be of great intellectual curiosity and flexibility, because the Swiss market is too small to permit an important degree of litigation specialization, such as doing exclusively banking or construction litigations. As a Swiss commercial disputes lawyer, you have to familiarize yourself with new legal and factual topics on a continuous basis.  

In the past twenty years, I have dealt with commercial disputes related to, for example, the following areas:

  • Private banking
  • Asset management
  • Foreign exchange trading
  • Large infrastructure projects
  • Mergers & acquisitions
  • Industry and trade

No litigator can guarantee you the outcome of a litigation. Neither can I. But what I can offer you is to present your case as convincingly as possible to the court or arbitral tribunal.